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Eating Recovery Center In The News: Motherhood Moment Blog

Parenting Pointers: Eating Disorder Awareness Research has shown that life changes, such as school transitions, can serve as triggers that may contribute to the development of an eating disorder. For this reason, Eating Recovery Center, an international center providing comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia, EDNOS and binge eating disorder, encourages parents of children and adolescents making these life transitions to be vigilant for early signs of eating disorders.   A 2012 study from the Journal of Clinical Nursing found that significant transitional events, as well as a lack of support following traumatic life events, could serve as eating disorder triggers. Researchers identified school transitions as one of the six main factors that triggered eating disorders among the individuals who participated in the study. School transition experiences such as adapting to a new environment, meeting increased academic demands, struggling with social pressures and grappling with the physiological changes that occur during adolescence can create a perfect storm in which an individual with a highly sensitive temperament or a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder may turn to disordered eating behaviors as an anxiety management tool or coping mechanism. To help parents manage their children’s transitions to new school environments, Eating Recovery Center highlights five back to school tips to help parents promote healthy attitudes about food and body shape and size.
  1. Look for discreet warning signs. Although weight loss can be an indicator of disordered eating, it may not be immediately apparent. A child may be displaying signs of an eating disorder if his or her schoolwork and grades begin to suffer, if he or she becomes socially withdrawn and increasingly anxious, tired and lethargic. Parents should also be aware if their child begins wearing roomier or layered clothing, even on warm days.
  2. Avoid comments about your child’s body shape or size. When shopping for new school clothes avoid commenting on your child’s weight or body size and instead focus on his or her preferences regarding color, style, etc. 
  3. Have an honest conversation about peer pressure and the dangers of replacing food calories with alcohol calories if your son or daughter is getting ready to make the move to college. Discuss the physical consequences of disordered eating and drinking behaviors, such as liver damage from excessive alcohol consumption or the significant internal damage poor nutrition can cause.
  4. Remind your teenage athlete not to overdo his or her training in an effort to make a high school sports team. Watch for signs of over-exercise, such as sports preparation when he or she is injured or sick, or exercise that significantly interferes with daily activities and schoolwork.
  5. Be a positive body role model. When helping an adolescent recover from the body-focused bullying that can sometimes accompany going back to school, a parent who has positive body image will have far more credibility than one who consistently criticizes his or her own looks.

Eating Recovery Center and Pathlight Mood and Anxiety Center are accredited through the Joint Commission. This organization seeks to enhance the lives of the persons served in healthcare settings through a consultative accreditation process emphasizing quality, value and optimal outcomes of services.

Organizations that earn the Gold Seal of Approval™ have met or exceeded The Joint Commission’s rigorous performance standards to obtain this distinctive and internationally recognized accreditation. Learn more about this accreditation here.

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