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Robyn Cruze Releases New Edition of Eating Disorder Book

Since writing the first edition of Making Peace with Your Plate, and while working as Director of Advocacy for Eating Recovery Center, I have had the privilege of speaking with so many of you. You've helped me reflect on many of our collective struggles and triumphs toward and in eating disorder recovery and beyond.
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When I was struggling with an eating disorder, I used to think that once I finally got recovery from it, I’d never think—or at least want to think—about eating disorders again. Back then, I thought that once someone had stopped bingeing, purging or starving, then that was the end of the illness. But as we all know, that makes recovery sound so easy. Like someone saying: “Just stop eating” or “Just start eating,” it’s never that easy. Recovery is a process that, in duration, varies and is different for all of us. 

Then seven years ago after years of recovery, I wrote a book about making peace with my food and my body and, well, myself. Because let’s face it, to make peace with our food and our bodies, we must also be willing to find peace and acceptance within ourselves. Back then, I thought I’d learned everything there was to know about the recovery process (haha)—I was wrong again. Which is great news because in our recovery process, we can often come up against obstacles that we can confuse as a dead end. “There’s no more hope for me,” we may think. But if there’s one thing that I have learned in recovery, there is always hope. 

Life is ever changing, including the recovery process—both personally and within eating disorder treatment. Personally, new challenges inevitably arise as we go deeper into our recovery process; trauma reveals itself, anxiety rears its head, or maybe we are one of the fifty percent of those overcoming eating disorders who will also be susceptible to substance use disorder. At the same time, within the treatment field, thankfully, new tools and therapies to support the recovery process are constantly being identified and shared.

It’s now been over 16 years in my eating disorder recovery, and I have learned so much more about the recovery process that I decided to write a second edition of the book. I’m not writing the book just because of my personal discoveries about recovery, although there has been many of them, including the fact that life and the joy found go far beyond the recovery process. Nor did I write it purely about the new industry updates that Espra has found. I wrote it because of you and what you have taught me over the past seven years.

Since writing the first edition of Making Peace with Your Plate, and while working as Director of Advocacy for Eating Recovery Center, I have had the privilege of speaking with so many of you. You’ve helped me reflect on many of our collective struggles and triumphs toward and in eating disorder recovery—and beyond. You’ve also had so many questions that I believe demand attention.

So many questions!

In the second edition of Making Peace with Your Plate, I wanted to address many of your questions such as: 

  • Are words such as “recovered” or “full recovery” in early recovery inspirational or are they another way for we who are trudging the road toward recovery to beat ourselves? 
  • What do those words mean anyway? Is there a textbook definition? 
  • Can we really “take back control” or “fight back” as if, somehow, we fight hard enough, we will overcome mental illness? 
  • Are there really no “good” or “bad” foods in recovery, and what do I do if I notice I’m drinking more alcohol?

You guys offered so many excellent questions that I had to write a second edition. Thankfully, Espra and our publisher agreed.

Do you have another question about eating disorder recovery that you want answered?

I truly believe recovery is so very possible. I also believe that life goes beyond the illness and even further beyond the recovery process. So, in the spirit of the national eating disorder awareness week (February 24 to March 1), I invite you to come as you are and take hold of your recovery today. It doesn’t matter how sick or what weight you are. It doesn’t matter how long you have struggled, or what diagnosis you have. All that matters is that you are willing to live a life beyond the illness, and in time, even beyond the recovery process where your truth, not the words of the eating disorder, prevails.

Thank you for all you have taught me!
Robyn 


Internationally-recognized author and speaker Robyn Cruze published Making Peace with Your Plate (Central Recovery Press) with Espra Andrus, LCSW, which will enter its second edition in February 2020. Her work has been featured internationally in media outlets including ABC, Sky News (Aust.), CBS, The Mighty, The Temper and Refinery 29. Robyn is the cofounder of a family mental health awareness initiative, Wide Wonder, that aims to make mental health and addiction recovery an everyday conversation. She also serves as a Director of Advocacy consultant at Eating Recovery Center. Follow Robyn on Instagram.
 

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