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The Eating Recovery Center Blog features frequent updates concerning Eating Recovery Center (ERC), our eating disorder treatment methods and programs, and upcoming meetings and events to help provide patients, families, professionals, and alumni alike with the information they need to understand their condition and enter on a path to long-lasting recovery.


January 24, 2020
What recovery has stopped is our defeat. The ocean – the eating disorder – will not overcome us. Instead, we’ve learned to swim. For some of us, maybe we are just treading water. “Does it ever stop?” Well, my urges to binge have quelled, but I still have the same brain. I am the same being. It’s just that, after recovery, I have a whole new set of skills.
 
DocumentID: 4285
DocumentTags: "binge eating disorder", bingeing, "kara richardson whitely"
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/the-urge-to-binge
January 15, 2020
Binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder, but it is the least talked about. And I’m not in the business of diagnosing someone, especially a character, but watching Kate’s story play out was like looking in a mirror. 
DocumentID: 4162
DocumentTags: "binge eating disorder", "kara richardson whitely", "kate this is us", "this is us"
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/binge-eating-disorder-this-is-us
January 14, 2020
Binge eating disorder is both under-diagnosed and yet the most prevalent eating disorder. In fact, there are 2.5 times more people with binge eating disorder than with anorexia and bulimia combined. When we are willing to acknowledge that binge eating disorder is a real illness, we can also be willing to do the work necessary to beat it — and, thankfully, there are resources in place to help us do the work.
DocumentID: 2300
DocumentTags: "binge eating disorder", events, "kara richardson whitely", "national eating disorder awareness week", patients, "symptoms & signs", treatment
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/binge-eating-disorder-is-real
January 14, 2020
How did I get to the point where I could brush off her comment without spiraling back into my eating disorder? I did not suddenly wake up one morning — fully recovered — thinking, “You know what? I really love and admire everything about my body today.” Recovery has been a gradual, ongoing process — as I practice accepting my body and appreciating its aesthetics and function. I know I’m not alone in having to learn how to accept and appreciate my body. Here are some suggestions for you to consider that may help you learn to love and accept your body, too:
DocumentID: 2228
DocumentTags: alumni, families, patients, "rachel king"
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/love-your-body
Tags: alumni  families  patients  rachel king  
January 14, 2020
To the older women struggling: Remember that you are not alone, you deserve a fulfilling life, and if you are willing, you have help on this journey. I will say that recovery has not been an easy journey. I have had my ups and downs, but it has been so worth it! I am an older woman, now 52, living with contentment, peace and joy. Shame and fear no longer call the shots in my life.
DocumentID: 3412
DocumentTags: alumni, "kelli evans", patients, "recovery ambassador"
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/women-over-40-eating-disorders
January 10, 2020
Strengthening our relationships with our bodies is a long and challenging process. However, with commitment, perseverance, strength, hope, and support, we can learn to develop a healthy and loving body image. Thankfully, there are many ways to do this:
DocumentID: 871
DocumentTags: #therapythursday, alumni, families, patients, professionals
NodeAliasPath: /blog/January-2020/loving-our-bodies
December 30, 2019
I realized that I had been putting off my own passion and joy because I’m too busy tending to the outside stuff — you know, all the stuff that grabs us with urgency. It’s easy to fall into this trap believing that if we can just complete all this stuff, then life will feel more in control, freer and joyful.
DocumentID: 2252
DocumentTags: alumni, families, "new year", patients, "robyn cruze"
NodeAliasPath: /blog/December-2019/ReSOULutions-not-resolutions
Tags: alumni  families  new year  patients  robyn cruze  
December 30, 2019
Americans’ top New Year’s resolutions are often to become more physically fit and lose weight. Because dieting and over-exercising are two activities that commonly contribute to the development of eating disorders, we caution against diving headfirst into a resolution focused on reducing body size, particularly if you have a family history of eating disorders.
DocumentID: 1094
DocumentTags: alumni, "bonnie brennan", "erc denver co", families, patients
NodeAliasPath: /blog/December-2019/new-year-resolutions
December 30, 2019
The start of a new year offers us an opportunity to think about plans for the future, goals, hopes and dreams. It is a great time to be working on recovery.
DocumentID: 740
DocumentTags: families, foundation, "new year", patients, treatment
NodeAliasPath: /blog/eating-disorder-recovery-new-year
December 30, 2019
Before you launch into your New Year's Resolutions, take a minute to bring yourself into the moment, find your breath. Once you feel calm and your breathing is even, begin by asking yourself these three simple questions...
DocumentID: 702
DocumentTags: alumni, families, "new year", patients
NodeAliasPath: /blog/December-2019/relaxing-new-year
Tags: alumni  families  new year  patients  
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