Mood and Anxiety Disorders Facts & Statistics

What are the Facts About Mood, Anxiety, & Trauma-Related Disorders?

Knowing the symptomscauseshealth risks and treatment for mood and anxiety disorders is important. Understanding the facts and statistics of just how prevalent and serious these disorders are is just as important.

  • Nearly one in ten people age 18 and older have a mood disorder (nlm.nih.gov)

  • About 40 million American adults have some type of anxiety disorder every year (nimh.nih.gov)

  • Women are 60 percent more likely to have an anxiety disorder than men (nimh.nih.gov)

  • Approximately 80 percent of individuals with eating disorders are diagnosed with another psychiatric disorder at some time in their life, most commonly depressive, anxiety and personality disorders. (Klump, Haye, Treasure & Tyson, 2009)

Facts & statistics reveals a very high dual diagnosis rate among eating disorders and mood, anxiety and substance disorders:

  • Of those with anorexia nervosa, 48 percent have co-occurring anxiety disorders, 42 percent have co-occurring mood disorders and 31 percent have co-occurring impulse control disorders

  • Of those with bulimia nervosa, 81 percent have co-occurring anxiety disorders, 71 percent have co-occurring mood disorders and 64 percent have co-occurring impulse control disorders

  • Of those with binge eating disorder, 65 percent have co-occurring anxiety disorders, 46 percent have co-occurring mood disorders and 43 percent have co-occurring impulse control disorders (Hudson, Hiripi, Harrison & Kessler, 2007)

  • People with eating disorders have a 64 percent lifetime rate of anxiety disorders; the most common diagnoses were obsessive compulsive disorder (41%) and social phobia (20%)

    • A substantial majority of eating disorder patients had the onset of OCD, social phobia, specific phobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder before the emergence of the eating disorder, suggesting that the disordered eating is a successful coping mechanism for those difficult feelings( Kaye, Bulik, Thorton & Barbarich, 2004)

  • Up to 50 percent of individuals with eating disorders also abuse alcohol or illicit drugs, compared with nine percent of the general population. (National Center of Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 2003)

Mental health issues are common; help is available

We believe that there is nothing to be ashamed of when you or a loved one needs help for a mental health issue. No one should have to suffer unnecessarily with an eating disorder or a mood, anxiety, or trauma-related disorder. 

In partnership with Insight Behavioral Health Centers, Eating Recovery Center provides effective, evidence-based care for all individuals living with mental health concerns. If you or a loved one needs help, please call 877-825-8584 to talk confidentially with an ERC Masters-level clinician.

chat with us

Eating Recovery Center is accredited through the Joint Commission. This organization seeks to enhance the lives of the persons served in healthcare settings through a consultative accreditation process emphasizing quality, value and optimal outcomes of services.

Organizations that earn the Gold Seal of Approval™ have met or exceeded The Joint Commission’s rigorous performance standards to obtain this distinctive and internationally recognized accreditation. Learn more about this accreditation here.

Joint Commission Seal
Schedule for a Free Consultation