Resource Center

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Resource Center

No one ever thinks their child or loved one will develop an eating disorder. But if that happens, you will need to understand the illness and how you can support the recovery process. Our Resource Center is filled with tips, checklists and information to educate and inform you on how to take care of your loved one – and yourself.


Tag: what to say

When one child is in treatment for an illness, be it medical or psychological, there is an impact on the entire family system. Although there will naturally be an emphasis on meeting the needs of the child in treatment, there are also things that can be done to attend to all the children in the family during this time. Here are a few things parents can consider:
Establishing effective communication patterns and ways of supporting a partner struggling with an eating disorder can be challenging.  There are several things a partner can do to weaken some of these barriers.
A list of do's and don'ts for eating recovery caregivers.
If you have a loved one who is suffering from an eating disorder, life as you knew it has been turned on its head. Eating disorders impact entire families. Every member is bound to struggle with this new reality and how they fit into it.
Upon your child’s return home from eating disorder treatment you will likely experience a mixed bag of emotions: relief, excitement, trepidation, and feeling overwhelmed. These are all normal and understandable emotions.
At one time or another, we have all been guilty of using disparaging self-talk related to weight, size or shape. This tendency is so commonplace in today’s culture that there is actually a term for negative body commentary, used by the general public and clinical circles alike: “Fat talk.”
In addition to a parent's stress that their child is struggling with a complex and life threatening illness, many parents have intense guilt stemming from the belief that they contributed to the development of the eating disorder. As a result of this guilt, they can tend to shoulder the burden of “fixing” their child.
At some time or another, all mothers have been there—we spend hours slaving over a lovely meal (or after a busy day, we defrost some tasty leftovers) and we lovingly place the plate in front of our child. Our efforts to feed them a delicious, balanced meal is met with screaming, crying, throwing, spitting, the silent treatment, demands for different food or an exasperating combination of these refusal behaviors.
Stress among children and adolescents is on the rise, and mental health professionals are seeing the impact as more children seek treatment for stress-initiated behavioral illnesses such as eating disorders.
Having a child or other loved one who is struggling with an eating disorder is scary stuff. You want to ease their pain and no doubt you are worrying about whether you are saying the “right” thing. This can be agonizing at times, as you try to figure out the best things to say.
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Eating Recovery Center is accredited through the Joint Commission. This organization seeks to enhance the lives of the persons served in healthcare settings through a consultative accreditation process emphasizing quality, value and optimal outcomes of services.

Organizations that earn the Gold Seal of Approval™ have met or exceeded The Joint Commission’s rigorous performance standards to obtain this distinctive and internationally recognized accreditation. Learn more about this accreditation here.

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